Tamkaliks 2018 Dance Contest Winners

  Photo from Wallowa County Chieftain:  Lewis Allen, a Nez Perce of Lapwaii, Idaho, competes with another dancer in the Junior Boy’s Traditional dance at the 2018 Tamkaliks.

Photo from Wallowa County Chieftain: Lewis Allen, a Nez Perce of Lapwaii, Idaho, competes with another dancer in the Junior Boy’s Traditional dance at the 2018 Tamkaliks.

Dancing, drumming and feasting

Perfect weather greeted the hundreds who attended the Tamkaliks Celebration July 20-22. The Sunday friendship feast in Wallowa enjoyed a record number of visitors this year. There is no charge for the event, so visitor count was based on the number of people fed (plates), which featured the usual spread of buffalo, elk and salmon and dozens of homemade side dishes and desserts. There were 600 plates allotted for the feast, and organizers ran out of plates.

Check out the rest of the photos and see the winners of the Tamkaliks dance competitions -->

PHOTOS BY ELLEN BISHOP

War Bonnet Special coming to Tamkaliks 2018

 Photo from Wallowa County Chieftain: Chieftain archive Colorful costumes worn by young and old are always in fashion during The Nez Perce Wallowa Homeland Project’s Tamkaliks Celebration.

Photo from Wallowa County Chieftain: Chieftain archive Colorful costumes worn by young and old are always in fashion during The Nez Perce Wallowa Homeland Project’s Tamkaliks Celebration.

...Saturday competition dancing begins at 1 p.m. Later that night, following the veterans dance at 7 p.m., is an event never seen before at Tamkaliks and not to be missed –– the War Bonnet special.

Fred Hill, chairman of Tamkaliks celebration, said bringing the War Bonnet special to Wallowa is long overdue

“We haven’t had this kind of special event at Tamkaliks, that’s why I felt we needed to do it,” said Hill, who lives in Nixyáawii.

Thomas Morning Owl is helping organize the event. He said when a tribal member brings out an ancestral war bonnet, he is sharing an important piece of his family’s history. In traditional dance, war bonnets are often worn by descendants of former tribal leaders.

“The war bonnets signify leadership roles in the family,” said Morning Owl, who is a resident of Pendleton. “This is a time for people to bring their heirlooms out in the public.”...

read more at the Wallowa County Chieftan -->

POWWOW FREEWAY

  Photo from Oregon Jewish Life: Headdresses at last year’s Wildhorse Powwow

Photo from Oregon Jewish Life: Headdresses at last year’s Wildhorse Powwow

Some say the Blue Mountains of Northeast Oregon, a vast lava flow that emanated from fissures in the earth, are the foothills of the Rockies. The escarpment rises abruptly from 1,000 feet at Pendleton to 3,600 at the top of Cabbage Hill on I-84.To the settlers emigrating on the Oregon Trail, the Blues were the penultimate barrier before reaching the Willamette Valley. To the Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla, the 1855 Treaty Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation east of Pendleton, they were and are the bountiful source of first foods, a place of recreation and, into the 19th century, a refuge from attack. To the Nez Perce, Chief Joseph Band, they blocked stockmen’s intrusion into the Wallowa Valley until the early 1870s....

read more at Oregon Jewish Life magazine -->

Tamkaliks Fundraiser Nets $1,200 for Scholarships

The Annual Tamkaliks Rummage Sale and (Buffalo) Chili and Frybread Feed saw a steady stream of visitors last weekend and raised $1,200 toward two $500 Tamkaliks scholarships: the Taz Conner and Terry Crenshaw Memorial.

The fundraising amount was “about average, perhaps a bit more” for the event and considered a great success, said Mary Hawkins, office manager for Wallowa Band Nez Perce Trail Interpretive Center. “We have a fabulous core group of volunteers. We are very grateful to them.”

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read more at Wallowa County Chieftain -->

Oregon's Wallowas: Witness the sad, familar story of Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce Indians

  Photo from LA Times:  Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce. (Pendleton USA)

Photo from LA Times: Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce. (Pendleton USA)

Before Lewis and Clark, Oregon Trail ruts, loggers or cattle ranches appeared, the peaceful and powerful Nez Perce, or Nee-Me-Poo (meaning the real people), called the Wallowas home.

Theirs is a familiar, sad story of the West. Discovery of gold led to broken treaties and a forced exodus to a reservation in 1877. Nearly 750 Nez Perce took a 1,170-mile evasive walk instead, pausing to fight the U.S. Army at their heels, before being captured about 40 miles from Canada...

Read the rest of the article in the LA Times Travel section -->